Knee Cap Pain Brisbane

Looking for treatment for your knee cap pain in Brisbane? Our Myotherapists can assess the cause and provide a range of treatment options to help decrease and eliminate pain and get back to doing the things you love.

By Roger Morelli – Brisbane Myotherapist and Remedial Massage Therapist

What is Patellofemoral (Knee cap) pain?

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome is a way of saying knee cap pain.

It affects a many people throughout their lives, but is more likely in active people and people with a few extra kilo’s.

Knee Cap pain is often experienced by those who enjoy dancing, running, jumping and hiking.  Hills and stairs will often trigger the symptoms in both active and sedentary populations.

Left untreated knee cap pain can involve tendons and irritate the joint leading to arthritic change.  Which is a shame – because it’s a condition that responds very quickly to evidence based therapy such as what we provide at Knead Massage Brisbane.

What causes Knee cap pain (Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome)?

The kneecap (patella) glides up and down through the thigh bone gap (femoral groove). When the knee is bent, pressure between the kneecap and the groove increases.  When muscles are fatigued, the kneecap can move in a fundamentally correct method, but slightly out of alignment - which creates inflammation.

Once this starts – it can lead to kneecap pain and chronic joint irritation (arthritic inflammation).

Common causes of knee cap mal-tracking are often muscular - weak glutes and also some of the four quadriceps working more than the others.

Foot posture as well as ankle stability and mobility are also common causes of knee pain.  Poor foot posture (e.g. flat feet) and weak hip muscles can allow the knee to twist in a way that causes irritation and result in a lateral movement of the kneecap.

Poor biomechanics can flare up a knee irritation.

What are the Symptoms of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome?

Kneecap pain usually happens over time, because bio mechanical causes gradually inflame the joint. Traumatic injury to the knee or foot/ankle complex can alter walking patterns and lead to irritation in the kneecap.

Patellofemoral pain symptoms are generally obvious during weight bearing activities such as walking and running.  Stairs, squats, hills and change of direction sports such as soccer can also provoke symptoms of knee cap pain.

What should you do if you have Knee cap pain?

Book in to see a Myotherapist, Remedial Massage Therapist or your GP.

Keep active, cardiovascular exercise that is not in a full weight bearing position has been shown to reduce arthritic pain and change in the knee.  3 x 30 min sessions of rowing machine or stationary bike are excellent exercises for knee pain – if they don’t provoke symptoms.

If you need to run for your emotional well being and you have knee pain – it is always good to learn how to apply kinesio tape yourself to reduce the pain.  We can show you lots of techniques for this.

The following link is a world famous best practice guide to managing kneecap pain

http://patellofemoral.trekeducation.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2018/10/KneePain_edited_folded_fixed2.pdf

What shouldn’t you do?

You shouldn’t avoid getting an assessment from a therapist.  You shouldn’t stop physical activity – finding the right activity to reduce your pain is the correct thing to do.  Stretching the quads can be an effective short term pain reliever for many knee conditions.  A well-managed knee shouldn’t affect your quality of life much at all.

How is Patellofemoral Pain treated?

Myotherapy and Remedial Massage Are effective modalities to reduce knee cap irritations.  Your Myotherapist will demonstrate the best exercises to take your pain away and improve your glute strength and improve quadriceps function.

Both Remedial Massage techniques and Myotherapy techniques such as dry needling, kinesio tape, Electro needling, Low Level Laser Therapy and joint mobilisations can also play a role in rapid pain reduction of kneecap pain.

Links

http://patellofemoral.trekeducation.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2018/10/KneePain_edited_folded_fixed2.pdf

http://semrc.blogs.latrobe.edu.au/5-things-to-help-knee-cap-pain/

http://semrc.blogs.latrobe.edu.au/exercise-medicine-knee-pain/

http://semrc.blogs.latrobe.edu.au/chronic-knee-pain-neuroscience-meets-exercise-pain-relief/

https://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2017-10-11/protect-your-knees-with-this-simple-workout/8803686

https://www.abc.net.au/health/minutes/stories/2009/11/19/2700843.htm

https://www.abc.net.au/health/minutes/stories/2003/08/04/916669.htm

https://www.healthdirect.gov.au/knee-pain

https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/knee-exercises-for-runners/

https://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2017-05-19/knee-osteoarthritis-treatment-falling-short-of-best-practice/8537656

references

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4975825/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5117058/

https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD010387.pub2/full

https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/8/11/e022920.abstract

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6093140/

https://www.bmj.com/content/351/bmj.h3939

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Robbart_Van_Linschoten2/publication/283542316_Patellofemoral_Pain/links/563de5d708aec6f17dda4774/Patellofemoral-Pain.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3391667/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5476763/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4282737/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4296532/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5640415/